Building emotional intelligence

The listen section of the course talks a lot about how to continue to build emotional intelligence by acknowledging and labelling feelings using words your child can easily understand.

In play, this could involve practicing naming any feelings involved. Your child’s, your own and also the feeling of the characters in the game.

“Oh, I wonder if he’s feeling left out now”, “Ouch! That must have hurt!”, “you are sad that the tower fell down!”

In reading together this could be chatting about the emotions involved. Ask what the character is feeling “Oh dear, Cinderella can’t go to the ball – I wonder how she is feeling right now?”, “How can you tell?”, “How would you feel if something like that happened to you?”

How helpful did you find this section of the course?

Is it something you have been able to implement when playing and reading with your child?

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I’ve done this bit of the course and it’s definitely a work in progress for me. Some of the phrases like the ones above feel a bit unnatural for me but I’m working on it as fully appreciate the importance of it

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I definitely find this much easier in play! My son loves a bit of role play and often acts out scenarios with his toys, which gives me the perfect opportunity to label feelings. With reading, it’s a bit harder but I’m working on it because I know from the course how important it is. We are doing our best @Mumof1 :muscle:

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I really like talking about feelings. So I find it quite natural when reading a book to ask about how one of the characters might feel about something. Or say how a story makes me feel. I enjoy talking about books as we’re reading them like this, not just reading the words. I think our girls do too. Particularly at bedtime - I think they think it’s lasting longer and making their bed time a little later :rofl:

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Interestingly this works on my younger ones but my 8 year old is less interested. Do others find that? Is it perhaps an age thing?

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Interesting @LondonParent. Mine are younger than 8 so not sure. I hope they don’t grow out of it. But maybe? Interested to hear others experiences.

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Hi @LondonParent, I have an 8 year old daughter and agree it’s a bit different to my younger one. The play is different so the opportunity is lost a bit as she will mostly be playing by herself and doesn’t want me around for play specifically. I take the opportunity to do this learning from the course when I read with her in the evening once the youngest is in bed. She loves reading so I’m fortunate in that sense as it provides the opportunity to talk about feelings in relation to whatever is happening in the book. Does your 8 year old like reading? Perhaps that could be an opportunity?

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Thank you. She’s a bit more reluctant to read with me and often takes herself off when reading but you’re right, it’s a good opportunity so I’m going to ask her if we can read together and open up the conversation that way. Thank you @sunshine84 :blush:

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Really started focusing on this at home and it’s working wonders, thank you :heart:

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